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Four AI Trends That Could Drastically Change Our Way of Life in 2018

Artificial intelligence (AI) is one of the challenging frontiers most technological firms and countries are trying their best to make landmark achievement and to control the industry.

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According to the latest McKinsey report, Google mother-company Alphabet has invested as many as $30 billion in AI technologies. Meanwhile, Chinese tech major Baidu is also said to be investing the same amount. In fact, Baidu pumped in $20 billion into AI in 2017. Notably, it’s not just companies who are investing in AI. A recent report by the New Yorker stated that China is aggressively pursuing innovations in the field of artificial intelligence.

In the light of such interest in and focus on AI, the year 2018 is all set to see landmark advancements in artificial intelligence. Let’s look at three promising AI trends for the year.

1. Artificial Intelligence becoming a political talking point.

AI is bound to create political debates as it can create and take away jobs at the same time. For instance, Goldman Sachs is planning to rollout 25,000 self-driving vehicles. This will be bad news for truckers. Similarly, huge warehouses have already started using robots and then livelihood of 1 million workers in the United States hangs in the balance.

In the 2016 US presidential election, President Donald Trump capitalized on anti-globalization and anti-immigration theme blaming them as the two main reasons for American workers losing their jobs. However, come 2018 midterm polls, the entire narrative could shift to automation and artificial intelligence, as the American worker is bound to adjust to the new work landscape.

2. Logistics to be more efficient.

Logistics management is becoming much more efficient. It is now possible to run a 20,000-sq-foot logistics warehouse with just a small crew. For example, Amazon Robotics is already using a combined force of artificial intelligence and advanced robotics to provide mega-retailers with unprecedented logistics solutions.

It will not be long before the warehouses will completely change structurally – instead of the being designed to accommodate human packers, they will soon be designed for robots that can work for 24/7. These robots don’t need lights to work and so the rooms may not need lighting which will save cost again.

The Amazon robots are designed to efficiently locate and move items in the company’s warehouses. The technology is already working very well for the company as it has brought about faster and cheaper ways of deliveries.

“I visualize a time when we will be to robots what dogs are to humans, and I’m rooting for the machines.” —Claude Shannon

3. Automakers to launch self-driving cars.

Since Tesla launched the first self-driving vehicle traditional automakers are jumping into the fray. Audi recently announced that its self-driving cars would be launched in 2018. The Audi A8 comes with a technology that is capable of shuttling humans without being directed by a driver. In addition, Cadillac and Volvo are also building a self-driving vehicle. We will be seeing more of AI in vehicles at least by mid- 2018.

4. AI to create content.

Believe it or not, AI is already being deployed in the creation of content. Some brands are already using AI technology to generate content are. They are USA Today, CBS and Hearst. Besides, Wibbitz, which is a software-as-a-service (SaaS) platform, enables publishers to convert written texts into video content via AI video production. In the traditional setup, publishers would spend hours and days to generate content for their websites or for their social media pages. Making video content has been made easier by the likes of Wibbitz. The Associated Press is also using a system called Wordsmith which is developed by Automated Insights. The system used natural-language generation method to create news stories after converting earnings data. We can expect news consumers will be seeing more content which is generated by natural-language and video-generation technologies.

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